Spreading fear and mayhem in the visual arts.

Archive for the Comics & Manga category

20 Most Popular Posts on Wurzeltod in 2011

by Suzanne on December 26th, 2011

To wrap up 2k11 on the Wurzelblog, I decided to post the 20 articles you guys liked best – according to likes, shares and reactions – and I must say, you’ve got a rather amazing and futureproof taste in the arts, people.

Many thanks for taking the time to submit stories, comment and interact in the past year(s).

(In order of popularity and ordered into rather random categories. Click on images to read stories.)

JAPANOPHILIA

ART FEATURES & REVIEWS

HISTORY & SCIENCE

INTERNA

Richard Stipl & Co.’s “Savant” at High Roller Society, London

by Suzanne on November 1st, 2011


Installation view of Savant at High Roller Society, London, showing Richard Stipl‘s work – click to enlarge

When I first got an invite to this show, I couldn’t believe that a London gallery would put together so many of my favourite young international artists for a group show. And a street art gallery on top of that!

Then I heard that artist Joe Becker was in charge of curating Savant and the epicness of it all immediately made a lot of sense.

Savant shows the works of Richard Stipl - who I still suspect to be the great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-grandson (YES, OF COURSE I calculated that!) of Franz Xaver Messerschmidt - Rory Dean, Peggy Kouroumalos, Joe Becker, James Unsworth et al.

I sincerely wish they hadn’t slapped the term “New Gothic Art” into their press release and what exactly is supposedly “idiotic” about any of this art I will never understand; as a matter of fact, I don’t even find any of it “offensive”, but oh well, this is the UK, I come from a different school of cannibalist Marxist thinking and I guess this type of work seems somewhat “strange” and “wacky” to the lazy European eyeball.

So let’s just agree that they’re fantastic works by very talented young international artists, ja? Danke.

Do go see this. It’s rare to get a group show like that in Londinium. Trust me.

Oh, and if someone could please tell me whether Stipl‘s The Ritual has indeed dentures on it or whether someone just left them there by accident, that would be much appreciated. They only appear in this installation view and the whole thing really confused me. Thanks.


Installation view of Savant at High Roller, London, showing Joe Becker‘s and Richard Stipl‘s work – click to enlarge

On show: Oct 29 – Nov 27, 2011

Address: High Roller Society, 10 Palmers Road, London, E2 0SY, UK, tube: Bethnal Green, Mile End, email: info(at)highrollersociety.co.uk, tel: +44 (0)208 981 8177 | Map

Hours: Thu – Sun: 12 – 6 PM, and by appointment

Press release | Installation views

WurzelForum discussion

Keiichi Tanaami’s “Hop Step Jump” published by Nieves

by Suzanne on October 21st, 2011


Double page from Hop Step Jump by Keiichi Tanaami, published by Nieves, 32 pages, 19.5 x 25.5 cm, color offset, 2011 – click to enlarge

I guess I have expressed my huge love affair with the small(est) press and tiny publication houses/rooms/shoeboxes here often enough by posting about releases by My Dance The Skull, Shelter Press, Le Dernier Cri, Atem Books and obviously also the now sadly defunct Kaugummi Books and Les éditions derrière la salle de bains. And everyone I forgot.

A small publisher that’s been around for a decade now releasing book after book and zine after zine is Zurich’s Nieves. Their catalogue is really diverse and eclectic and they have their own iPhone app and they’re an incredibly progressive and very driven bunch of people.

Why am I telling you all this? For mainly three reasons:

• Because a lot of small art zine publishers are struggling to survive due to a low-to-non-profit nature of their business and no-advertisement approach while doing highly important communication work for the visual arts. So they deserve your support.

• Art zines are often super cheap, a lot of them numbered and limited in edition size, lovingly produced – a lot of them screen-printed or printed on Risographs or Goccos, and they simply offer you so much more authenticity and genuinity than a glossy mag.

• Nieves has just released a little book on the art of Keiichi Tanaami and it’s super tasty and psychedelic.


Double page from Hop Step Jump by Keiichi Tanaami, published by Nieves, 32 pages, 19.5 x 25.5 cm, color offset, 2011 – click to enlarge

Hop Step Jump is a fantastic visual journey through Keiichi Tanaami‘s memories and nightmares. Born in Tokyo in 1936, he absorbed the horrors and grotesquery of warfare from early childhood and later wrote about these experiences and how they affected his art:

“I was rushed away from my childhood, a time that should be filled with eating and playing, by the enigmatic monstrosity of war; my dreams were a vortex of fear and anxiety, anger and resignation. On the night of the air raid, I remember watching swarms of people flee from bald mountaintops. But then something occurs to me: was that moment real? Dream and reality are all mixed up in my memories, recorded permanently in this ambiguous way.”

You can preview the book here and purchase it here.

Akino Kondoh’s “KiyaKiya” at Mizuma Art Gallery, Tokyo

by Suzanne on October 14th, 2011


Waiting (sketch) by Akino Kondoh, pencil on gesso, mounted on canvas, 2008, 26 ×38 cm – click to enlarge

Oh, Akino Kondoh! There are only few artists who can cut us so softly yet viscerally with melancholy and dreamy childhood imagery like her.

There’s a way she draws her bodies with enormous economy and minimalism in the line yet absolutely bursting with voluptuousness that her girls are always suggestively frivolous and provocatively inviting us to some innocently perverted play. Lustful feral Kindfrauen – not unlike Anke Feuchtenberger‘s Die Hure H (The Whore H) and Fuco Ueda‘s dripping nymphets.

Ladybird’s Requiem, which won her a YouTube award, illustrated this fluidity perfectly:

For the first time in 3 years, and after her international success as cover artist for Top Shelf’s AX – A Collection of Alternative Manga, Akino presents a new animation, KiyaKiya - hopefully soon to be seen on her YouTube channel - as well as drawings, oil paintings and sketches at Tokyo’s Mizuma Art Gallery.

The very sweet press release explains:

“The term “KiyaKiya” comes from the old Japanese expression “mune ga kiyakiya suru.” Kondoh first encountered it in Shibusawa Tatsuhiko’s “Introduction to the collection of girls” in the chapter about “childhood experiences.” This expression, which describes “an enigmatic, nostalgic, disturbing feeling,” or an impression of “deja-vu”, is at the origin of the “KiyaKiya” series.

Kondoh says “very intimate things are easier to share with strangers than public ones.” In the present exhibition, you will experience an uneasy and nostalgic feeling, as if you had long forgotten an important something and were about to remember it. Some memory locked down in your heart might very well resurface.”

… and now, music!

On show: Oct 11 – Nov 12, 2011

Address: Mizuma Art Gallery, 2F Kagura Bldg., 3-13 Ichigayatamachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-0843, Japan, tel: +81.3.3268.2500 | Map

Hours: Tue – Sat: 11 AM – 7 PM

Press release

Catalogue: A catalogue containing 200 sketches for the animation “KiyaKiya” will be presold at the gallery. (ISBN:978-4-904292-16-7)

Artist’s website

WurzelForum discussion

Kazuhiko Nakamura’s “Atoma” – An Homage To Astro Boy

by Suzanne on September 23rd, 2011


Atoma by Kazuhiko Nakamura, 2011 – click to enlarge

And while we’re doing breathtaking one-image features, here’s Kazuhiko Nakamura‘s brand new piece Atoma – a spectacular homage to Osamu Tezuka‘s iconic Tetsuwan Atomu – yes, you could tell by looking at Atoma‘s hair… err… spirals, couldn’t you?

As the artist himself puts it, it’s a “biomechanical Astro Boy” so if I read any mentions of “steampunk” in the discussion thread, your comment will be glue gunned and your IP stuck to a cog and sold on Etsy. Cause that’s what happens with steampunk. Yes.

If you happen to be Facebook friends with Kazuhiko, you can see in-progress pictures of Atoma here.

“Panacea”, A New Chris Conn Askew Print & MonsterBrains Honours Virgil Finlay

by Suzanne on August 29th, 2011


Panacea by Chris Conn Askew – click to enlarge

My incredibly talented and anachronistically noble friend Chris Conn Askew has a gorgeous new print available. His limited editions normally sell out really fast, cause you know, who doesn’t want a lusciously curly lady with velvety puff sleeves and cat scratches on her cheek sitting in a lower jaw hanging on their walls? EXACTLY.

Panacea is a giclee print on 180gsm Hahnemühle paper, signed and numbered by the master and comes in two different sizes at 8”x10” (20x25cm) for $60 and at 14”x18” (36x46cm) for $100. Shipping is an additional $10 to anywhere in this solar system. How cool is that? VERY! Each size is strictly limited to a single edition of 250.

Needless to say that compared to what his prints tend to sell for once they’ve sold out, that’s a fucking steal, children.

Read CC’s post here on how to secure yourself a print.

I know it’s one of the weirder compliments to give, but whenever I get absorbed by the ancient symbolism of Askew‘s art, I just cannot help thinking that had he been alive during the times of Dr. Robert Ley, he would have doubtlessly been asked to be Hauptlayouter of the Organizationsbuch der NSDAP. God, I’m truly shit at compliments, but I know he’ll get it…

In other retina-tickling news, the obsessive-compulsive Aeron Alfrey of MonsterBrains fame has posted THE absolute Virgil Finlay überpost – one that even the Great Old Ones will enjoy.


© Virgil Finlay, via MonsterBrains – click to enlarge

Julie Heffernan in San Francisco & Alex CF’s limited edition of “Many Dead Things”

by Suzanne on August 28th, 2011


Budding Boy by Julie Heffernan, oil on canvas, 78 x 56 inches, 2010 – click to enlarge

This coming Saturday, September 3, Julie Heffernan‘s highly anticipated solo show Boy O Boy II will be opening at Catharine Clark Gallery, 150 Minna Street, San Francisco.

Since it’s totally impossible to notice the subtleties, the intricate microcosms (see for instance the tiny ladder in Budding Boy bottom left), the cultivated pastoral or the symbiotic opulence which are all so very essential to Julie‘s work in an online reproduction, I would highly recommend you to go see Boy O Boy II in person if you happen to be in S.F..

The official reception is actually not until September 10, 4 – 7 PM. The exhibition will remain on show until October 29, 2011.


© Alex CF

Good news just reached us from Alex CF HQ: Alex’s acclaimed debut monograph Many Dead Things – The Specimens of Lord Merrylin will be released as a new edition. Click here for more details and here to pre-order your own copy.

The release is limited to 100 copies only – each of them signed – containing 140 pages of glorious cryptozoology, a foreword by the great Reece Shearsmith from League of Gentlemen and costs £30.

Finally, and for absolutely no reason other than CAUSE I FUCKING CAN, please enjoy these fabulous horror GIFs that were brought to my attention by the SameHat Tumblr. If you happen to have any information on their source and/or creator, please do get in touch.


Click images to enlarge

Brendan Danielsson’s “Diarrhainbow” & Jeremy Enecio’s “Embodiments” in California

by Suzanne on August 14th, 2011


Violet by Brendan Danielsson, 2011 – click to enlarge

I’ll keep this post brief because, well, it’s Sunday and I cannot be arsed to type much and I honestly couldn’t add anything of great significance to Brendan Danielsson‘s ingenious scatological eloquence anyway:

di•ar•rhain•bow

noun
An arch of colors formed in the sky in certain circumstances, caused by the refraction and dispersion of the sun’s light by a spray of liquid feces violently discharged from the bowels and dispersed into the atmosphere.

Why don’t all artist’s statements read like this, ffs?!

Diarrhainbow opened yesterday at CoproNason on 2525 Michigan Ave in Santa Monica and remains on show until September 3. You can preview the entire show here.

In very related news, I stumbled upon a fantastic zine by Reasonable Person that deals with the serious issue of “super diarrhea“. Nice introductory words on the first pages, forsho.

Also, and in completely other news, the fantastic Jeremy Enecio is currently showing a new body of work under the title Embodiments at Gallery Nucleus on 10 East Main St, Alhambra. You can preview the show here – it runs until August 29.


Fauna by Jeremy Enecio, acrylic and oil on paper, 2011 – click to enlarge

… and finally, for no reason other than keeping the nets as nonsensical and WTF as possible, I bring you The First Rap Song To Be Performed In The UK (Look Around You)

… and Tales of the Riverbank

BAI.

GIFification of Junji Ito’s “Uzumaki”

by Suzanne on July 30th, 2011


Animated version of Uzumaki by Junji Ito

Same Hat recently posted a couple of simplistic yet captivating GIFified versions of the great Uzumaki – what a fantastic way to start the weekend!


Animated version of Uzumaki by Junji Ito

If you’ve never read Uzumaki you can find it in its scanlated entirety here.


Animated version of Uzumaki by Junji Ito

I respect Junji Ito not only highly for his vast contribution to the horror manga industry – which earned him a Kazuo Umezu Prize – but also for his years of dedication to and obsession with the high art of dentistry because, let’s face it, teeth are a WAY creepier thing than anything he’s ever drawn.


Animated version of Uzumaki by Junji Ito

So click here for more Uzumaki GIF fun and here for random GIF fun.

Chicago People: Kaugummi at Golden Age, one-night-only!

by Suzanne on July 8th, 2011


From Dondoro by Estelle Hanania & Hoichi Okamoto, published by Kaugummi, 2011, 48 pages, FR/EN, full colour offset, 1000 copies – click to enlarge

If you happen to find yourself in Chicago tomorrow evening: This is an event not to be missed as one of my very favourite French publishers of small press is having a retrospective displaying more than 70 zines from their 7-year publishing history.

If you’ve never heard of Kaugummi Books, you obviously haven’t been paying attention to this blog and I suggest you go stand in a corner and think about what you’ve done.


From It’s My Life by Aleksandra Waliszewska, published by Kaugummi, 2010, 20 pages, black and white on pink paper, 100 copies, handnumbered – click to enlarge

For all others: The event will take place at Golden Age from 6 – 9 PM tomorrow and I highly suggest you show up with a few bucks to support independent publishing.

Venue details below.


From Death Patrol by Stephane Prigent, published by Kaugummi, 2011, 20 pages, printed on grey paper, 100 copies, handnumbered – click to enlarge

On show: Jul 9, 2011, 6 – 9 PM

Address: Golden Age, 119 N Peoria St. #2D, Chicago, IL 60607, USA, tel: +1 312 288 8535

Opening hours: Fri – Sat: 12 – 6 PM and by appointment

Kaugummi Books

WurzelForum discussion