Spreading fear and mayhem in the visual arts.

Archive for the Performance Art category

Berlinde De Bruyckere in Melbourne and Istanbul

by Suzanne on July 22nd, 2012


019 by Berlinde De Bruyckere, 2007, wax, epoxy, metal, glass, wood, blankets, 293.5 x 517 x 77.5 cm, Collection Claude Berri © Andri Stadler- click to enlarge

I’ve often raved about Berlinde‘s art on here - in fact, her work even invades my everyday life as arty backdrop - so I’ll spare you the superlatives but instead just want to make you aware that if you’re Melbourne-based, you now have less than a week left to catch her fascinating We Are All Flesh show at the ACCA.

In case you were wondering: Yes, Berlinde did have a show with the same title three years ago at Hauser & Wirth in London but it seems that different and lots of newly commissioned works are on display in Melbourne.

If you’re not yet familiar with her work, the 15-minute interview below offers a great introduction into her vision, process and technique but of course will neither replace the olfactory, visceral and epidermic qualities of the wax, skin, hair and fabrics she uses for her sculptures, nor explain the necrophiliac alchemistic ways in which she can turn branches into limbs, tree trunks into fresh corpses by masterfully applying an organic colour palette (pinks for skin, off-white for adipose tissue, greys/greens/blues for the circulatory system) onto wax with which she can control, halt and synthesise transformation, decay, death.

If you’re not in Australia but in.. who knows.. Turkey, you can also catch her Wound show at the ARTER Space for Art in Istanbul until August 26 where she has inspired Vincent Dunoyer to dance Bruyckeresque choreographies in the exhibition space surrounded by her sculptures.

Details for the Istanbul show can be found here. The information below is for the ACCA exhibition.

On show: Jun 2 – Jul 29, 2012

Address: ACCA, 111 Sturt Street, Southbank, Melbourne, Victoria 3006, Australia, tel: +61 3 9697 9999, email: info@accaonline.org.au | Map

Hours: Tue – Fri: 10 AM – 5 PM, Sat – Sun: 11 AM – 6 PM, Mon: By appointment

Admission: FREE

Press release

WurzelForum discussion

Yinka Shonibare’s “Addio del Passato” at James Cohan Gallery, New York

by Suzanne on February 28th, 2012


Fake Death Picture (The Death of Chatterton – Henry Wallis) by Yinka Shonibare, MBE, 2011, digital chromogenic print, framed: 58 5/8 x 71 1/4 in. (148.91 x 180.98 cm) – click to enlarge

To be perfectly honest with you, I would even post about this show if I didn’t like a single artwork on display other than Fake Death Picture (The Death of Chatterton) (top) because channeling my favourite accidental (?) suicide painting of all time will always get you a mention on here.

Oh, wait, and there’s that… that fucking machine… err… pardon me, Anti-Hysteria Device (bottom). Yeah.

For Addio del Passato, British-born Nigerian artist Yinka Shonibare has once again worked with his signature fabrics and created beautifully lavish costumes in bold colours and absolutely delectable opulent interiors achieving a gorgeous chiaroscuro of fabrics, textures and complexions so rich that you’re almost forgetting you’re actually looking at scenes of death. Well, at least a series of photographic re-enactments of famous death and suicide scenes of art history.

Overall, I will have to admit that I preferred the works from Yinka‘s Goya phase but you know me – I just like to complain.

Btw, if you missed Yinka‘s beautiful Nelson’s Ship in a Bottle on Trafalgar Square’s Forth Plinth, you might be able to see it at the National Maritime Museum in future if their campaign to save it from being sold is successful. Meanwhile, Elmgreen and Dragset have put a semi-nude very camp golden boy ridin’ a poneh in its place and I’m of course always very pleased about any kind of prepuberty sleaze in public squares.

Details below.


Anti-Hysteria Device by Yinka Shonibare, MBE, 2011, Dutch wax printed cotton textile, wood, metal with motor, 30 3/8 x 41 x 18 7/8 in. (77 x 104 x 48 cm), photograph: Stephen White – click to enlarge

On show: Feb 16 – Mar 24, 2012

Address: James Cohan Gallery, 533 West 26th Street New York NY 10001, USA, tel: 212.714.9500, email: info@jamescohan.com

Hours: Tue – Sat: 10 AM – 6 PM

Preview | Press release

Artist’s website

WurzelForum discussion

Gisèle Vienne & Dennis Cooper with “Teenage Hallucination” at Centre Pompidou, Paris

by Suzanne on February 22nd, 2012


© Gisèle Vienne, via Dennis Cooper’s blog – click to enlarge

Director/writer team Gisèle Vienne and Dennis Cooper have been working as a pair on theatre projects since 2004 and are now presenting a series of haunting productions, puppets and portraits at the Centre Pompidou in Paris.

Their show Teenage Hallucination evokes uncanny memories of the Chapman Brothers‘ army of creepy mutant girls (particularly the brothers’ recent hybrid girl army with THEY TEACH US NOTHING swastika hoodies).

However, Gisèle‘s Olimpias are a lot less grotesque and hyperreal than the Chapman‘s creations but more cracked and broken in their appearance and there’s a subtle sense of mutilated and traumatised individuality in her adolescents’ intimidated stares and serious outfits.


© Gisèle Vienne, via Dennis Cooper’s blog – click to enlarge

39 dolls will be on show as an installation accompanied by a beautifully shot photographic documentation of Gisèle‘s work with and on them.

Also on show will be Gisèle‘s and Dennis‘ newest theatrical piece which was produced in collaboration with Stephen O’Malley of SunnO))) fame (working on sound as well as wall drawing designs) entitled Last Spring: A Prequel (a trailer has not emerged yet, sadly, but will be added to this post later).


© Gisèle Vienne, via Dennis Cooper’s blog – click to enlarge

But that’s still not all because Teenage Hallucination is part of a festival at the Centre Pompidou that’s packed with talks, presentations and screenings with other artists, filmmakers and authors and this coming Sunday promises to be particularly interesting/provoking with a presentation of Peter Sotos’ Mine Kept and Pierre Dourthe (Hans Bellmer author) discussing The Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death.

The full programme of festival events is here. It’s quite intense if not slightly insane. Teenage Hallucination itself has opened tonight and will remain on view until March 12. Further details below.

On show: Feb 22 – Mar 12, 2012

Address: Centre Pompidou, Espace 315, 75191 Paris cedex 04, France, tel: +33 (0)1 44 78 12 33 | Map

Admission: FREE

Hours: Daily: 11 AM – 9 PM

Press release

Artist’s website

WurzelForum discussion

Witch House 101

by Suzanne on February 22nd, 2012

We interrupt this broadcast to bring you this important intergalactic message from the data highway/PoE:

Oh Sukkuhn’s “The Text Book (Chulsoo and Younghee)” at Base Gallery, Tokyo

by Suzanne on September 27th, 2011


From The Text Book (Chulsoo and Younghee) by Oh Sukkuhn – click to enlarge

In his first solo show in Tokyo, South Korea-born, Nottingham-educated artist Oh Sukkuhn (Suk Kuhn Oh) is currently presenting his Text Book series at Base Gallery.

The Text Book looks all kawaii but reveals way darker, more historically complex and socially traumatic layers upon further inspection – lessons from Korea’s turbulent past and possibly even memories of Oh Sukkuhn‘s own time as a photographer in the South Korean army.

The series is inspired by a boy named “Chulsoo” and a girl named “Younghee” – two Korean textbook characters from the Park Chung-hee era that have survived through the mid-90s.

From the gallery’s (originally Japanese) press release:

“By making “Chulsoo” and “Younghee” visible once again in his works, Oh Sukkuhn might be questioning us what the individual memory actually is or whether the memory not only stays in each of us but also prevail beyond in the nation perhaps. Works of insightful question and skepsis from the viewpoint of present-day Korean artist give us the moment to think over the derivation of our memories.”

.. and in the words of the artist himself:

“I wanted to collect our memories to create a new textbook that tells about our pain, [which stems] from identity confusion, while being depicted against dismal backgrounds. [I also wanted to explore the] individual’s sacrifice; needed for rapid economic growth in Korea. At that time it was considered that social values were more important than an individual’s existence. [...]

We may not exactly decipher their actions or feelings, but we can remember parallel moments in our own lives of hurt, embarrassment, shame, or other mortifications.”

Details below.


From The Text Book (Chulsoo and Younghee) by Oh Sukkuhn – click to enlarge

On show: Sep 21 – Oct 22, 2011

Address: Base Gallery, Matrix Japan S.A., 〒103-0025, Koura Daiichi Bldg. 1F 1-1-6 Nihombashi Kayabacho Chuo-ku Tokyo, Japan, tel: +81(0)3-5623-6655, email: info@basegallery.com | Map

Hours: Mon – Sat: 11 AM – 7 PM

Press release

WurzelForum discussion

Gabríela Friðriksdóttir’s “Crepusculum” at Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt

by Suzanne on September 23rd, 2011


By Gabríela Friðriksdóttir, courtesy Cueto Project – click to enlarge

From the witchy hands of Gabríela Friðriksdóttir comes Crepusculum – her newest archaic-organic, proto-pagan, neo-ritualistic, chaos-elemental project . Yes, I made all these words up.

And to be even more annoying, I decided to not give you a preview of the actual work on show at Schirn Kunsthalle in Frankfurt but of past works, because, to be quite frank with you, Crepusculum reminded me very much (too much?) of my esteemed friends Kahn & Selesnick‘s work – only in a slightly more Burning Man fashion.

Opens this coming Wednesday, Sep 28 – the artist will be in attendance. Details below.


Still from Björk‘s Where is the Line? by Gabríela Friðriksdóttir, courtesy Cueto Project – click to enlarge

Opening reception: Wed, Sep 28, 2011, 7 PM onwards – artist will be in attendance

On show: Sep 29, 2011 – Jan 8, 2012

Address: Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt, Römerberg, 60311 Frankfurt, Germany, tel: +49.69.299882.0, email: welcome@schirn.de | Directions

Hours: Tue, Fri – Sun: 10 AM – 7 PM, Wed-Thu: 10 AM – 10 PM

Admission: €5

Press release

WurzelForum discussion

Rong Rong & Inri at Blindspot Gallery, Hong Kong

by Suzanne on September 10th, 2011


In Bad Goisern, Austria 2001 No. 1 (detail) by Rong Rong & Inri, hand-dyed gelatin silver print, 2001 – click to enlarge

One of the Asian photography world’s most interesting art couples – Fujian-born (China) Rong Rong and his Kanagawa-born (Japan) wife Inri – are currently showing their first-ever solo exhibition Three Begets Ten Thousand Things at Hong Kong’s Blindspot Gallery.


East Village, Beijing 1995 No. 9 by Rong Rong, gelatin silver print, 1995, featuring Zhang Huan – click to enlarge

As an admirer of both Rong Rong‘s early oeuvre (I admit this might have something to do with a decade-old crush on artist Zhang Huan who appears in many of Rong Rong’s pictures from that period) as well as their more elemental collaborative contemporary pieces, I’m glad to see that both their photographic past and present are equally highlighted in the exhibition:

“The exhibition consists of two parts. Part I presented at Blindspot Gallery (Central), will be a selection of Rong Rong’s most significant series dating from the early 1990s including East Village, Ruins and Wedding Gown.

Part II presented at Blindspot Annex (Wong Chuk Hang), will feature a decade of collaborative work of Rong Rong & Inri.”

Details below.


East Village, Beijing 1994 No.12 by Rong Rong, gelatin silver print, 1994, featuring Zhang Huan – click to enlarge

On show: Sep 10 – Nov 13, 2011

Address: Blindspot Gallery, 24-26A, Aberdeen Street, Central, Hong Kong, tel: +852 2517 6238, email: info@blindspotgallery.com | Blindspot Annex, 15/F, Po Chai Industrial Building, 28 Wong Chuk Hang Road, Hong Kong, tel: +852 2873 3819, email: info@blindspotgallery.com | Map

Opening hours: Tue – Sat: 11 AM – 7 PM

Preview | Press release

WurzelForum discussion

September YouTube Finds: Rathergood, SRL, Chatbots, Hot Dogs, Demon Kogure, Arino, Godzilla Bukkake & More

by Suzanne on September 6th, 2011

An irresponsibly random and certainly headache-inducing selection of YouTube videos in no logical order whatsoever that people who are not following me on Twitter will most probably have missed:

The amazing When Clive Was Alive by Rathergood (via Substrom)

Survival Research Lab’s A Bitter Message of Hopeless Grief from 1988 (via Binnorie)

Two chatbots talking to each other (via Valentina Tanni)

“If I was a hot dog everyone would love me!” (via Misanthropop)

Kiyohiko Senba & The Haniwa All-Stars feat. Demon Kogure (via Substrom)

Misanthropop loops Arino in I Can’t Leave You Alone

Godzilla Bukkake! (via Misanthropop)

Keine Ahnung: Im Himmel with violin by Hermann Kopp (via ILLFM)

Three Quick Thoughts About the Organisation of Things

by Suzanne on June 29th, 2011

- I –

Courtauld Gallery, London

I was supposed to go see a Toulouse-Lautrec & Jane Avril exhibition (apart from some St Vitus Dance pictures from the Salpêtrière, it wasn’t worth it) but ended up staring at the gorgeous ceilings and floors of the Courtauld. Magnificent and esoteric.

- II –

Japanese Divers

The amazingly talented and ever inspiring Amrei Hofstätter of Verticospuppets posted this on my Facebook wall the other day. Watch it – it’s like Leni Riefenstahl only wetter and portrays human robotics at its finest.

- III –

Miners’ Hymns

A few months ago, Sir Substrom was kind enough to share Jóhann Jóhannson/Bill Morrison’s The Cause of Labour is the Hope of the World with me which visualises everything summarised by the term “epic” and I’m glad to say that the commentary-less documentary it serves as a trailer to, The Miners’ Hymns, is now available on DVD from the BFI.

Take that, neofolk!

Eikoh Hosoe (yes, AGAIN!) at Clair, Munich

by Suzanne on June 22nd, 2011


Yukio Mishima as Saint Sebastian by Eikoh Hosoe – click to enlarge

Yes, I know I abuse every Eikoh Hosoe exhibition announcement to indulge in Mishima erotica when the rest of his oeuvre is absolutely breathtaking, but deep deep down, you all want to see Mishima’s perfectly toned oily near-naked body (… and ANYWAYS, I even threw in a Kazuo Ohno to be fair!)


Kazuo Ohno by Eikoh Hosoe – click to enlarge

People who are close to me know of my obsession with St Sebastians in art, and I actually have to admit that I now completely forgot what I wanted to write about here but OH BOY!

Exhibition details are below and let’s here it from the man himself:

“The world to which I was abducted under the spell of [Hosoe’s] lens was abnormal, warped, sarcastic, grotesque, savage, and promiscuous…It was, in a sense, the reverse of the world we live in, where our worship of social appearances and our concern for public morality and hygiene create foul filthy sewers winding beneath the surface. Unlike ours, the world to which I was escorted was a weird, repellent city—naked, comic, wretched, cruel, and overdecorative—yet in its underground channels there flowed, inexhaustibly, a pellucid stream of unsullied feeling.”

Mishima’s preface to Eikoh Hosoe‘s Ordeal by Roses


From Ordeal by Roses by Eikoh Hosoe, gelatin silver print, 1963/1976 – click to enlarge


On show: Jun 7 – Jul 16, 2011

Address: Clair, Franz-Joseph-Str. 10, D-80801 München, Germany, tel: +49.(0)89.386674-42/46, email: info@clair.me | Map

Gallery hours: Wed – Sat: 3 – 7 PM, and by appointment

Preview | Bio