Spreading fear and mayhem in the visual arts.

Archive for the Erotica category

Colette Calascione at Nancy Hoffman Gallery, New York

by Suzanne on April 20th, 2012

[Please excuse the very long blog absence - I am without a stable internet connection and now terribly behind schedule with posting but I'm planning to brief you about 25 important shows that are currently taking place ALL AROUND THE GLOBE in these next few days. Please be patient while I'm getting hammered in bar after bar in order to find some unprotected Wi-Fi networks. Arggh.]


Girl With Monkey by Colette Calascione, oil on panel, 36 x 24 inches, 2011 – click to enlarge

I haven’t mentioned Colette Calascione on here in over 6 years now which has to do with a general lack of shows and then her website disappearing into the Abyss ov thee Deepnet.

At any rate, Colette has made up for it all by currently having a solo exhibition at Nancy Hoffman Gallery in New York showing works from the past six years.

Her works are as allegorical as ever – maybe now a bit more clear-cut and marblelike and the backdrops and backgrounds often even more dazzling in complementary colours and more complex in industrial detail.

Indeed, it almost feels like she has broken the time/space continuum and time travelled back to Christian Schad‘s studio together with Jared Joslin and Alex Gross to indulge in some decadent art deco japonism and probably to visit a cabaret or the Grand Guignol.

Good to see she’s back.

Her solo show will close tomorrow, April 21, so don’t miss it if you’re in New York. All details and links below.


Alia by Colette Calascione, oil on panel, 14 x 11 inches, 2009 – click to enlarge

On show: Mar 15 – Apr 21, 2012

Address: Nancy Hoffman Gallery, 520 West 27th Street, New York, NY 10001, USA, tel: (212) 966-6676, email: info@nancyhoffmangallery.com | Map

Hours: Tue – Sat: 10 AM – 6 PM

Press release | Works on display | Installation views

WurzelForum discussion

Yinka Shonibare’s “Addio del Passato” at James Cohan Gallery, New York

by Suzanne on February 28th, 2012


Fake Death Picture (The Death of Chatterton – Henry Wallis) by Yinka Shonibare, MBE, 2011, digital chromogenic print, framed: 58 5/8 x 71 1/4 in. (148.91 x 180.98 cm) – click to enlarge

To be perfectly honest with you, I would even post about this show if I didn’t like a single artwork on display other than Fake Death Picture (The Death of Chatterton) (top) because channeling my favourite accidental (?) suicide painting of all time will always get you a mention on here.

Oh, wait, and there’s that… that fucking machine… err… pardon me, Anti-Hysteria Device (bottom). Yeah.

For Addio del Passato, British-born Nigerian artist Yinka Shonibare has once again worked with his signature fabrics and created beautifully lavish costumes in bold colours and absolutely delectable opulent interiors achieving a gorgeous chiaroscuro of fabrics, textures and complexions so rich that you’re almost forgetting you’re actually looking at scenes of death. Well, at least a series of photographic re-enactments of famous death and suicide scenes of art history.

Overall, I will have to admit that I preferred the works from Yinka‘s Goya phase but you know me – I just like to complain.

Btw, if you missed Yinka‘s beautiful Nelson’s Ship in a Bottle on Trafalgar Square’s Forth Plinth, you might be able to see it at the National Maritime Museum in future if their campaign to save it from being sold is successful. Meanwhile, Elmgreen and Dragset have put a semi-nude very camp golden boy ridin’ a poneh in its place and I’m of course always very pleased about any kind of prepuberty sleaze in public squares.

Details below.


Anti-Hysteria Device by Yinka Shonibare, MBE, 2011, Dutch wax printed cotton textile, wood, metal with motor, 30 3/8 x 41 x 18 7/8 in. (77 x 104 x 48 cm), photograph: Stephen White – click to enlarge

On show: Feb 16 – Mar 24, 2012

Address: James Cohan Gallery, 533 West 26th Street New York NY 10001, USA, tel: 212.714.9500, email: info@jamescohan.com

Hours: Tue – Sat: 10 AM – 6 PM

Preview | Press release

Artist’s website

WurzelForum discussion

Nazif Topçuoğlu at Green Art Gallery, Dubai

by Suzanne on February 23rd, 2012


Like Thieves at Midnight by Nazif Topçuoğlu, c-print, 121 x 210 cm, 2011 – click to enlarge

Ah, I missed the glorious opportunity to tie this post in with my recent article on Hisaji Hara – it would have been a very smooth and insightful transition as both Nazif and Hisaji sure are experts in the complex inner workings and psychopathologies of Balthusesque girlhood.

Nazif has a particularly great eye for all those (mind) games girls play and he uses the anachronistic form of the tableau vivant as his artistic modus operandi and way to study these games.

They’re not too overcrowded tableaux though so every single protagonist becomes an integral part of the plot. The girls strike pathos-laden meandering poses reminiscent of distant art history – to mind come motives such diverse as the Pietà, the Deposition from the Cross, the Incredulity of Saint Thomas, Salome, even the Raft of the Medusa, Liberty Leading the People and famous death scenes from Jacques-Louis David’s Marat to Henry Wallis’ gorgeous Death of Chatterton. I could go on. I want to go on as this is exactly what makes Nazif‘s work so very rich but I’m afraid I’d never get to an end.


The Turtle Charmer by Nazif Topçuoğlu, c-print, 167 x 120 cm, 2011 – click to enlarge

The details of the scenes are staggering too and always spot on: We see seductively parted lips, extruding collar bones, golden glowing skin – youth doesn’t come much more beckoning than as it’s captured in Nazif‘s work.

It’s also fascinating to observe that his group scenes never seem staged, but narrated; his girls are never exposed but embedded; they are not vulnerable and exploited but self-conscious and very much in charge of the scene – in one sentence: They have definitely grown up.

In a way, it could be argued that Nazif is just as much a director or a choreographer as he is a photographer because getting these nuances right is something that has a lot to do with understanding every single bone and muscle of the body and face – and that’s also precisely what gives his tableaux a very painterly, very warm, very intimate, very incarnate and very baroque atmosphere.

I know it’s probably rather unlikely you are in the United Arab Emirates right now but if you ARE, do go check out his very comprehensive solo show at Green Art Gallery in Dubai until March 5. Details below.


Introspection by Nazif Topçuoğlu, c-print, 120 x 168 cm, 2010 – click to enlarge

On show: Jan 11 – Mar 5, 2012

Address: Green Art Gallery, Al Quoz 1, Street 8, Al Serkal Avenue, Unit 28, P.O.Box 257 11, Dubai, UAE, tel: + 9714 346 9305, email: info@gagallery.com | Map

Preview

Artist’s website

WurzelForum discussion

Hisaji Hara at Michael Hoppen Gallery, London

by Suzanne on February 18th, 2012


A Study of “Because Cathy taught him what she learnt” by Hisaji Hara, 2010 – click to enlarge

I think it must have been the lovely Nana Rapeblossom who first introduced me to Hisaji Hara‘s work a few months back and I must admit that it comes as a bit of a surprise to see him showing at Michael Hoppen now.

Don’t get me wrong, I have nothing against Hoppen as it’s a fantastic gallery with superb curating and as a matter of fact, they’re also hosting a marvellous Guy Bourdin show at Hoppen Contemporary right now – but it seems I had just subconsciously assumed that for his first solo show on European soil, he would choose a museum rather than gallery context given his penchant for highly composed arrangements and established European painters, especially (and obviously) Balthus.


A Study of “But it was one of their chief amusements to run away to the moors” by Hisaji Hara, 2010 – click to enlarge

There’s softened spatial serenity, composed simplicity, powdered sexuality, layered architecture, and ahistorical frozen theatricality to his works which are all aspects that are becoming ever rarer in a contemporary photography landscape which often seems dominated by the ironic dirty scenester snapshot so it’s a huge joy and inspiration to see such works being appreciated “over here”. Definitely a must-see for all London folks.

Opens Feb 24. Details below.


A Study of “Katia Reading” by Hisaji Hara, 2009 – click to enlarge

On show: Feb 24 – Mar 31, 2012

Address: Michael Hoppen Gallery, 3 Jubilee Place, London SW3 3TD, UK, tel: +44 (0)20 7352 3649, email: gallery@michaelhoppengallery.com | Map

Hours: Mon – Fri: 10.30 AM – 6 PM, Sat: 10.30 – 5 PM

Preview

Artist’s website

WurzelForum discussion

20 Most Popular Posts on Wurzeltod in 2011

by Suzanne on December 26th, 2011

To wrap up 2k11 on the Wurzelblog, I decided to post the 20 articles you guys liked best – according to likes, shares and reactions – and I must say, you’ve got a rather amazing and futureproof taste in the arts, people.

Many thanks for taking the time to submit stories, comment and interact in the past year(s).

(In order of popularity and ordered into rather random categories. Click on images to read stories.)

JAPANOPHILIA

ART FEATURES & REVIEWS

HISTORY & SCIENCE

INTERNA

(Late) Crismis YouTube Special

by Suzanne on December 25th, 2011

Please excuse the lack of updates in the recent past, gentle reader. It’s due to very bad internet access that pretty much only allows me to update my Facebook with the usual award-winning and highly offensive daily dose of anti-information.

Anyways, because this is an oh-so special time of consumerist rubbishness, I decided that I should really annoy you and your family with some very obnoxious LOLmas videos for absolutely no reason.

Featuring an awesome Jewish kid, a very disappointed non-Jewish kid, Heino, as well as Irish and 3D creepiness. Thanks to PoE for the inspiration and beautiful and very talented Suzanne Walsh for the Moving Crib video from her homeland.

Enjoy.

Oh, and if you made it this far without an intracerebral hemorrhage, I suggest you now lock yourself in a pitch-black room with this video projected onto all four walls. Then swallow the key.

Merry Whatever from Wurzeltod. x

Matsui Fuyuko print editions and exhibition at Yokohama Museum of Art, Japan

by Suzanne on December 6th, 2011


Keeping Up the Pureness by Matsui Fuyuko, 2005 (original) and 2010 (reproduction) – click to enlarge

Matsui Fuyuko. Insanely talented, bright, stunningly beautiful. And modest. There’s more than enough reasons to worship this artist but for me personally, it’s the fact that she wrote her doctoral dissertation on The Inescapable Awakening to Pain, through Visual Perception via the Sensory Nerves. *bites lips*

If you don’t want to take my word for it but convince yourself of her many talents, please watch this footage of her working on Carved Limbs on an Altar over here on YouTube (sadly, embedding has been disabled).

I must say it’s an absolute mystery to me why she’s not as big in the occidental art world as back in Japan but it seems that enthusiasm for her work is slowly growing and as every so often, it’s French galleries and publishing houses leading the way. And anyways, it’s not like art appreciation in the West in this apathetic and ironic century still has ANYTHING whatsoever to do with technique, ingenuity, originality, imagination or vision. Sometimes it actually seems like it’s the very opposite that’s in demand.

Anyways, back to Matsui Fuyuko: First of all, Gallery Naruyama in Tokyo in conjunction with Galerie DA-END in Paris has released a beautiful signed and limited edition box sets of Matsui‘s oeuvre containing 20 of her artworks, including the very popular Nyctalopia and Keeping Up the Pureness (above). It can be pre-ordered from Naruyama for JPY 46,000. There’s also a “KIRI” special deluxe set in an edition of 45 only which includes an engraving of the gorgeous Rough Draft for Virgin Specimen (2009, bottom) for JPY 480,000. More details on how to reserve and order here.

And before you go “Uh, that’s very pricey. Bitch!” think about what sums the likes of Mark Ryden sell BOOKS full of repetitive iconography for these days. Also check the edition size on that. Exactly. I rest my case.

And in other brilliant news, Matsui Fuyuko will have an exhibition entitled Becoming Friends with All the Children in the World which opens later this month at Yokohama Museum of Art and will remain on view until March 2012. I know it sounds like a Michael Jackson manifesto, but I’m somehow sure that’s not what it’s about at all. More details about the show below.


Rough Draft for Virgin Specimen by Matsui Fuyuko, 2009 – click to enlarge

On show: Dec 17, 2011 – Mar 18, 2012

Address: Yokohama Museum of Art, 3-4-1, Minatomirai, Nishi-ku, Yokohama 220-0012, Japan, tel: +81 (0)45 221 0300 | Map

Hours: Fri – Wed: 10 AM – 6 PM

Admission: ¥1,100

Preview & press release

Artist’s website

WurzelForum discussion

Mirka Lugosi at Confort Moderne, Poitiers, France

by Suzanne on December 2nd, 2011


© Mirka Lugosi, 2008

I posted an introduction to Mirka Lugosi‘s work only back in October when she was showing her work in Montpellier and well, she’s already having another exhibition entitled L’Homme Invisible on French soil, this time held at Confort Moderne in Poitiers.


© Mirka Lugosi, 2006 – click to enlarge

It’ll remain on display until January 2012 and from what I can see it’s a very comprehensive show focussing on her drawings and presenting works from pretty much the entire past decade of her artistic shenanigans.. but wait, there is more:

“[...] L’exposition au Confort Moderne se construit autour d’un ensemble représentatif de son travail des dix dernières années et inclut d’autres travaux comme des illustrations des années 80 et 90 ou encore des archives des lives du Syndicat. Enfin, quelques photos vintage de Gilles Berquet et des éléments mobiliers qui l’accompagnent lors de ses séances de travail donnent une vue élargie de l’œuvre et du parcours de Mirka Lugosi.”

Ouais! Do go check this out, les enfants! Details below.


From the Le malaise enchanté series by Mirka Lugosi

On show: Nov 19, 2011 – Jan 13, 2012

Address: Le confort moderne / Association L’Oreille est Hardie, 185 rue du Faubourg du Pont-Neuf, 86000 Poitiers, France, tel: +33 [0]5 49 46 08 08, email: box[at]confort-moderne[dot]fr

Hours: Mon – Fri: 2 – 6 PM

Preview & press release

Artist’s website

WurzelForum discussion

Cris Brodahl & Duncan Marquiss at “Secret Societies”, CAPC musée d’art contemporain, Bordeaux

by Suzanne on November 22nd, 2011


The Cure by Cris Brodahl, oil on glued canvas, 2009, courtesy Marc Foxx – click to enlarge

Like every so often and just to piss you off, I’m hijacking yet another exhibition announcement (I am apparently not the only one to not be terribly convinced/slightly confused by) to introduce you to the work of Cris Brodahl (top & middle) and Duncan Marquiss (bottom), two great young artists that haven’t been featured here yet - at least not that I know of and I’m way too lazy to do a search. Y? Cause.


Reality (detail) by Cris Brodahl, oil on glued canvas, framed, 2009, courtesy Marc Foxx

Don’t get me wrong, Secret Societies has a pretty epic line-up of artists that, taken per se, are often great talents – particularly the brilliant Markus Schinwald (showing his Untitled/Radetzky) and the ontologically ingenious Suzanne Treister who has created a plethora of vast artistic universes like few other artists.

However, the specific works selected seem to mainly underline something I find a bit problematic with young hyped contemporary art: It all looks rather pseudo-alchemical, faux-mysticistic, ironically psychedelic, post-neo-pagan, and in the end and upon closer inspection, it’s really just rather superflat on neon (no, srsly, there’s plenty of neon in the exhibition design…). In this context, all seems a bit like someone’s Tumblr has come alive and even the minimalist sculptural pieces don’t work anymore and look more like lost furniture from some space opera.

However, as always, please do enlighten me if you’ve seen the show and actually enjoyed it – I’m honestly just making all these observations based on the installation views and the press release I was sent.

Secret Societies – To Know, To Dare, To Will, To Keep Silence opened earlier this month and will remain on show until February 2012. All details below.

Please note that the artworks shown here will not be on display and serve merely to portray the artists’ oeuvres.


Untitled by Duncan Marquiss, coloured pencil on paper, 2008, courtesy Dicksmith Gallery – click to enlarge

On show: Nov 9, 2011 – Feb 26, 2012

Address: CAPC musée d’art contemporain, Entrepôt. 7, rue Ferrère, Ville de Bordeaux, F-33077 Bordeaux, France, tel: +33 (0)5 56 00 81 50

Hours: Tue – Sun: 11 AM – 6 PM

Admission: €5

Introduction | Press kit

WurzelForum discussion

“Surrealismus in Paris” at Fondation Beyeler, Riehen, Basel

by Suzanne on November 19th, 2011


La poupée by Hans Bellmer, painted wood, papier-mâché, mixed media, 1935/36, 61×170×51 cm, courtesy Centre Georges Pompidou, Musée national d’art moderne, photo © Collection Centre Pompidou/Vertrieb RMN/Georges Meguerditchian/ProLitteris – click to enlarge

I dislike the way big art metropoleis *cough* London *cough* always label their sell-out shows *cough* Leonardo da Vinci *cough* as “Shows of the Century” when - IF you can afford the outrageous admission prices at all - these shows are normally so totally overrun you really can’t appreciate the art or are even given a specific time slot and need to get the hell out after 30 minutes. Trust me, I know. I actually went to the last “big da Vinci thing” in London a couple of years back but I can’t even recall whether it was at the V&A, the Royal Academy or the British Museum. All I remember is that I COULDN’T SEE SHIT and people had the NERVE to bring their Dan Browns along. Jesus Christ.

Anyways, so thankfully, there’s always the smaller, quieter places that put on masterpieces of curating in the middle of nowhere – pretty much overlooked by the international media.

Well, one such tremendous art historical chef-d’oeuvre of a show is currently taking place at the Fondation Beyeler in Riehen near Basel.

It’s devoted to Surrealism in Paris and features some of the most outstanding works of the one art movement that will never ever die.

Amongst the usual suspects that I won’t even bother mentioning here because the Beyeler is pretty notorious for its huge collection of surrealist art, you will meet the conjoined limbs of Hans Bellmer, the giant eyes of Paul Delvaux, the apocalyptic dreamscapes of Max Ernst and the sculptural synaesthesia of Méret Oppenheim.

Yes, I know right?! o_O

The exhibition looks also very stunning from an interior design point of view and a lot of effort, time.. and obviously money.. has been spent to contextualise and document the pieces. Definitely one to check out if you’re in Switzerland.

Surrealismus in Paris runs until the end of January 2012. Details below.


Der Gegenpapst by Max Ernst, oil on canvas, 1941/42, 161×127 cm, courtesy Peggy Guggenheim Collection, photo © David Heald/The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation/ProLitteris – click to enlarge

On show: Oct 2, 2011 – Jan 29, 2012

Address: Fondation Beyeler, Baselstrasse 101, CH-4125 Riehen, Basel, Switzerland, tel: +41 – (0)61 – 645 97 00, email: info@fondationbeyeler.ch | Map

Hours: Mon – Sun: 10 AM – 6 PM

Admission: CHF 25.– (but special deals with public transport!)

Introduction | Preview | Press images

WurzelForum discussion